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NOTE: This article previously appeared in the January 23, 2012, edition of SoapboxWeekly.com.

A Sad Anniversary For Children

Every January 22, there is a commemoration of that day in 1973 when the Supreme Court of the United States legalized abortion. This decision was the watershed event and landmark event in the battle over the dominant moral issue of our time. The battle, of course, is between those -- the pro-choicers -- who consider the life of a child who is developing in the womb to be a choice and those -- the pro lifers -- who consider the life of a child who is developing in the womb to be just that -- a child.

The pro-choicers claim that those who are pro-lifers are trying to tell women what to do with her body. However, what the right-to-life position really is is nothing more than the desire to give each child who is developing in the womb only the same opportunity that each person who is alive today -- and those include those who are pro-choice -- had; and that opportunity is the opportunity to be born. Those who are pro-life are asking for that and nothing more.

Those who defend the pro-choice position often say that it is always a difficult decision for a woman to make. However, in all honesty, isn't abortion simply a decision of convenience more often than it is a difficult one of conscience? Those who are pro-choice claim that the decision should be left to a woman and her doctor. But how about the man? It is intellectually and argumentatively inconsistent to claim that the man has equal responsibility to support the child after birth (which is correct) but has no say in whether or not to abort the child. Rights and responsibilities should go hand-in-hand. But somehow, a man's rights magically disappear when it comes to abortion. And the doctor? Is it his child? Aside from medical necessity in order to save the woman's life, what business is it of the doctor's? (If the doctor is a man, it is an awful irony when one considers the fact that many pro-choicers complain that those who legislate -- the majority of whom are male, should have no say in the abortion debate, unless he is an aiding and abetting doctor.)

Again, let's simply give all children the chance that all of us, including pro-choicers, had; and that is the chance to be born.